Cancer Rehabilitation – There is a Need.


Great article from the New York Times in April related to Therapy in Cancer Rehabilitation

After Physical Therapy, Why Not Cancer Therapy? – The New York Times
By Susan Gubar April 7, 2016 12:30 pm

“Cancer patients like me would profit from supportive care aides who could spring us from this induced passivity and its accompanying fear. In my case, such a counselor would have allayed the bewilderment of treatment and also empowered me to exert a modicum of control over the broken rhythms of everyday existence.
………
Why not use the model of the occupational and physical therapist in orthopedics to create a central role for therapists in oncology, advisers who could help cancer patients help themselves in taking small, strengthening steps? After surgery and at the start of chemotherapy, my family and I would have given anything for the house calls of a creature we never imagined: an oncological therapist”.

Please click here for full article

We are excited to offer this course presented by Lisa VanHoose:
Evidence Based Cancer Rehabilitation Resources and Its Role in Cancer Survivorship
Advances in the medical management of cancer have steadily increased survival rates. Research shows that most cancer survivors will have at least one physical side effect of cancer treatment, including fatigue, neuropathy, muscle weakness, and balance deficits. This interactive course will provide evidence-based tools and strategies for the care of patients with diverse cancer types across the cancer continuum. The course will also address functional outcome measures and reimbursement concerns.

August 26-27, 2016 – Laguna Hills, CA
September 23-24, 2016 – White Plains, NY
October 28-29, 2016 – Framingham, MA
November 18-19, 2016 – Hollywood, FL

There is obviously a need for Cancer Rehab. Therapy.
What are your experiences and thoughts?

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One Response to Cancer Rehabilitation – There is a Need.

  1. Lisa VanHoose says:

    Surveillance models of rehabilitation have been recommended by multiple stakeholders, including cancer survivors, caregivers, healthcare providers and some insurance companies. The benefits include the early identification of cancer related side effects, reducing disease burden, increasing return to work and productivity at work, improving quality of life, and reducing risk of recurrence or additional primary cancer diagnosis. There is a definite needs for rehabilitation providers to consider developing a cancer rehabilitation program in their communities.

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